APAP Showcase Mutual Dance Theatre (2020)

Please visit mutualarts.org. Contact Jeanne Mam-Luft at jeanne@mutualarts.org. More information, marketing materials, and full-length videos available. More information, marketing materials, and full-length videos available. 1:48 — Quick “sizzle” reel. 4:17 — FFIFF by Jasmine Snellen was created for the camera.…

APAP Showcase Mutual Dance Theatre (2020)

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Please visit mutualarts.org.
Contact Jeanne Mam-Luft at jeanne@mutualarts.org.

More information, marketing materials, and full-length videos available.

More information, marketing materials, and full-length videos available.

1:48 — Quick “sizzle” reel.

4:17 — FFIFF by Jasmine Snellen was created for the camera. The acronym stands for different aspects of how she, as a Black woman, is processing the current crises.

7:26 — /SHIFT/ is about the shifting of power: while not a linear narrative, the work follows a community of people after an unseen catastrophe. It’s really about trust and where our psychology goes when it comes to survival. Although you don’t see them in these excerpts, this is one of our works that incorporates a large cast of community members as “extras.” This work is an audience and festival favorite. It’s available as an evening-length or as 10 or 20-minute works.

12:42 — Iceman 3000 by Susan Honer and Sean Simon features an original sound score by Mr. Simon and was originally staged in collaboration with the Contemporary Arts Center. Here, it was premiered in a long gallery in the iconic, Zaha Hadid-designed building. The work imagines how future humans may think of us today.

15:52 — Double|Sided is another audience favorite, created by Steven P. Evans and Elena Rodriguez Moore. It was created for premiere in an alternative venue where we split audiences in half and put them on opposite sides of the stage. You can see that these walls we dance with were a major element to the work. This work was inspired after civil unrest in the summer of 2013, both internationally (in the Middle East) as well as in the US after George Zimmerman was found not guilty.

24:22 — Maps is another one of our iconic works, preferably performed with an animated projection that underscores the themes of territory, boundaries, and colonization, as well as the individual’s journey to find home. In this excerpt, you will see a “zoom in” that says, “YOU ARE HERE.” We try to update that zoom-in to show the actual venue in which the work is being performed. Some audience members familiar with their local maps catch on to that and it’s very fun to hear their reactions. This work is available as a 45-minute evening-length or in 10 or 20 minute versions.

31:33 — Climb was created by Elena Rodriguez Moore and is largely autobiographical; the somewhat narrative work was inspired by her Colombian father’s immigration here and her own difficulties growing up bi-racial.

36:13 — Memoriam was subtitled “in memory of memory,” and delved into how much our memories make us. This is one of our other works, along with /SHIFT/, that utilized a cast of community members. In this one, we specified senior citizens. You will catch a glimpse of them at the start of the clip. This work also uses animated video projection throughout. You might catch that some of the floating bubbles in the opening solo are actually little home movies from the 50s and 60s. Vintage videos from our very own community are featured throughout the work, but not seen much in these particular excerpts.

44:43 — Mind Cloud is a short work (about 12 minutes) by guests Cody Szarko and John Litzler, who are formerly from Visceral Dance Chicago and River North, respectively. This piece is about a natural mental resistance we all have to changing the way we think.

49:35 — Intermittent Restraint is one of our more traditional-looking crowd-pleasers, choreographed by a South Carolina-California-now-Wisconsin artist, Amy Querin. This piece was created after she suffered the loss of her husband, shortly after their marriage. He had suddenly but also slowly died of leukemia and eventually the rejection of organ and marrow transplants, which the artist had the duty of approving.

52:28 — Night Passage is by Betsy Miller, originally an Ohioan, but currently living in Salem, Massachusetts. Night Passage is a portrait of a traveling person — it highlights both a frantic state of mind, contrasted with one that is more tranquil.

54:25 — Lastly, The Tragedy of Time was titled after artwork from the German Expressionist Period. This piece was originally created as a site-specific work for the Cincinnati Art Museum’s grant hall and actually opened with dancers coming down the staircases. We adapted it for a 10-minute proscenium work, which you see here. The work was created originally for city-wide collaboration at the centennial of WWI.

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