The Fun of Being Thoughtful 1950 Coronet Instructional Films; Schoolroom Social Guidance

Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney more at http://quickfound.net/ SHOWS THAT SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT INVOLVES INSIGHT INTO THE MOTIVES, TASTES & DESIRES OF OTHERS. THIS INSIGHT, “THOUGHTFULNESS” IS SHOWN HERE TO BE INTELLIGENT EXERCISE & APPLICATION OF A FEW SOCIAL SKILLS;…

The Fun of Being Thoughtful 1950 Coronet Instructional Films; Schoolroom Social Guidance

Source

Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney

more at http://quickfound.net/

SHOWS THAT SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT INVOLVES INSIGHT INTO THE MOTIVES, TASTES & DESIRES OF OTHERS. THIS INSIGHT, “THOUGHTFULNESS” IS SHOWN HERE TO BE INTELLIGENT EXERCISE & APPLICATION OF A FEW SOCIAL SKILLS; NOTICING WHAT OTHERS LIKE & WANT.

Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_guidance_film
Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Social guidance films constitute a genre of educational films attempting to guide children and adults to behave in certain ways. Originally produced by the U.S. government as “attitude-building films” during World War II, the genre grew to be a common source of instruction in elementary and high school classrooms in the United States from the late 1940s to the early 1970s. The films covered topics including courtesy, grammar, social etiquette and dating, personal hygiene and grooming, health and fitness, civic and moral responsibility, sexuality, child safety, national loyalty, racial and social prejudice, juvenile delinquency, drug use, and driver safety; the genre also includes films for adults, covering topics such as marriage, business etiquette, general safety, home economics, career counseling and how to balance budgets. A subset is known as hygiene films addressing mental hygiene and sexual hygiene…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coronet_Films

Coronet Films (also Coronet Instructional Media Inc.) was a producer and distributor of American short social guidance films from 1946 to the early 1970s founded by David A. Smart. The company, whose library is currently owned and distributed by The Phoenix Learning Group, Inc., produced instructional films aimed at young teenagers and high school students which were produced by dozens until the mid-1950s when production tapered off. Social guidance on topics such as dating, family life, courtesy and citizenship were typical themes of the films with occasional educational topics such as the solar system and the human body.

Coronet was active during the 1973-4 school year when they placed over 60 titles for evaluation with Project METRO of the Capitol Region Education Council (CREC), in central Connecticut. Titles included A Is For Alphabet, Color, Color Everywhere, Dating Scene, and Understanding Shakespeare: His Stagecraft. Many of the titles in their catalog were produced early in the post-war film boom; they were typical of the quality, production values, and content of media of the period: no better, no worse, and often humorous in the context of the post mid-1960s sexual revolution, but true artifacts of their time.

After the earliest films entered the public domain (a large percentage of the library is still privately owned), the films of Coronet were recognized by many as notable kitsch, especially after a few became shorts for Pee-wee’s Playhouse & the cable TV show Mystery Science Theater 3000 which mocked the films’ production values and underlying messages. Shorts featured on Mystery Science Theater 3000 include Are You Ready for Marriage? and What to Do on a Date. The 1947 film Shy Guy featured an early appearance of a 19-year-old Dick York. Many films were directed by Ted Peshak. Many of Coronet’s other films were later riffed by Rifftrax, a successor to MST3K, created by former MST3K cast member Michael J. Nelson…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *